India is abandoning Monsanto’s GM cotton for indigenous varieties

Indian tribal farmers hold placards as they take part in a demonstration against the United Progressive Alliance (UPA) government to protest against the promotion of multinationals in farming sector by the Indian government at the time in Bhopal, India, 31 March 2012. Farmers staged protests under the campaign 'Hamara Beej Abhiyan' or 'Our Seed Agitation' to protest against Monsanto, the US-based multinational agricultural biotechnology corporation, and other world trade organisations, demanding they leave India. The farmers claimed that one decade has completed for the BT cotton industry accepted in professional farming as a result of which farmers engaged in cotton farming have become helpless and poor by the day and also got debt-ridden and are compelled to commit suicide from time to time. The farmers alleged that with the introduction of genetically modified BT cotton in the country, such companies are monopolising the seed industry.

Indian tribal farmers hold placards as they take part in a demonstration against the United Progressive Alliance (UPA) government to protest against the promotion of multinationals in farming sector by the Indian government at the time in Bhopal, India, 31 March 2012. Farmers staged protests under the campaign ‘Hamara Beej Abhiyan’ or ‘Our Seed Agitation’ to protest against Monsanto, the US-based multinational agricultural biotechnology corporation, and other world trade organisations, demanding they leave India. The farmers claimed that one decade has completed for the BT cotton industry accepted in professional farming as a result of which farmers engaged in cotton farming have become helpless and poor by the day and also got debt-ridden and are compelled to commit suicide from time to time. The farmers alleged that with the introduction of genetically modified BT cotton in the country, such companies are monopolising the seed industry.

By NEOnline | IR

India is dumping Monsanto’s genetically modified Bt cotton in favor of “desi”, an indigenous variety, which comes at half the cost and farmers are allowed to save seed to plant next year.

Sales of the seed are down by 15% year on year, worth $75 million according to Reuters.

Monsanto stands losing the world’s biggest cotton producer and second largest exporter of the fiber. While Monsanto’s Genetically Engineered cotton variety remains dominant, the government is promoting indigenous varieties. Monsanto may have lost as much as 5% to indigenous varieties this year alone.

Additional losses come from Indian farmers dumping the water-intensive cotton in favour of other crops, like pulses and lentils; there has been a 10% drop in cotton production year-on-year.

The main competitive advantage of the Monsanto seed is resistance to pest such as the bollworm, but not to the whitefly, especially common in India during dry seasons. Local varieties appear more resistant to whitefly, while Monsanto’s resistance to bollworm is declining.

https://www.neweurope.eu/article/india-gradually-dumps/

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The Secret Life of Cara Delevingne ♦ ELLE Culture

“If I don’t cry pretty much every day I will hold it in, and it will manifest in me.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why Raf Simons’s Hire at Calvin Klein Is Good for New York Fashion ♦ Vogue Runway

Raf Simons and Jennifer Lawrence at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute Benefit, 2013 Photo: BFA

Raf Simons and Jennifer Lawrence at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute Benefit, 2013
Photo: BFA

Calvin Klein confirmed today the long-rumored appointment of Raf Simons. The Belgian designer replaces Francisco Costa on the women’s side, and Italo Zucchelli on the men’s, both of whom exited the company in April of this year, as Calvin Klein’s chief creative officer. The news has galvanizing potential, and not just for fans of Simons’s 21-year-old eponymous men’s collection or of his work at Jil Sander or Christian Dior, the prestigious French fashion house he abruptly left last October. He’s good for New York fashion.

Simons is a designer’s designer. His July 2012 haute couture debut for Dior was attended by Azzedine Alaïa, Donatella Versace, Alber Elbaz, Riccardo Tisci, Diane von Furstenberg, and Olivier Theyskens, lending the changing-of-the-guard moment an historic aspect. Simons’s Dior was a markedly different one than that of his predecessor John Galliano, modernist and introspective, where Galliano’s was historicist and flamboyant, and the influence of his sleek minimalism spread across fashion’s four capital cities. Off-White founder and Kanye West’s creative director Virgil Abloh, meanwhile, is an obsessive collector of Simons’s menswear; “he’s my Martin Margiela, my Michael Jordan,” he told me. To look at the output of Simons and Abloh is to see a direct link.

Soon, Simons will be a New Yorker, mingling at industry events and negotiating crowded Garment District streets, but he’ll bring the glamour and buzz of Paris to the Big Apple with him. Editors, buyers, and other influencers who leave New York early to get to London for its collections, or who go home for a little R&R in advance of Milan and Paris, will be inclined to stick it out until Calvin’s traditional end-of-week show to discover for themselves how the intellectually inclined Simons will interpret the spare sensuality that is the Calvin signature. Or maybe Simons will put his stamp on things with a new Fashion Week slot? As the hottest ticket in town (sorry Marc, Alex, et al), he’d have that prerogative. A new day and time for Calvin Klein could reshuffle the whole New York schedule.

From left: Raf Simons Spring 2017; Dior Couture Fall 2015; Jil Sander Fall 2012 Photo: (from left) Umberto Fratini / Indigital.tv; Yannis Vlamos / Indigital.tv; Marcus Tondo / GoRunway.com

From left: Raf Simons Spring 2017; Dior Couture Fall 2015; Jil Sander Fall 2012
Photo: (from left) Umberto Fratini / Indigital.tv; Yannis Vlamos / Indigital.tv; Marcus Tondo / GoRunway.com

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State of the Reunion with Jeff Pilson

The Official Jeff Pilson Blog

Hey everyone – it’s been a year since my last Q&A with Jeff Pilson, and I’m excited to run another “State of the Union” interview for you all. As usual, there is a lot to talk about, and I’ve done my best to cover the bases, but this one will certainly play heavier on the “State of the Reunion” due to the big announcement this week about DOKKEN! – Michael

Here we go…

  • Hey Jeff – it’s hard to believe another year has come around since our last Q&A… I just want to start by thanking you for always being willing to update your fans like you do.

JEFF: No prob.  It’s all about communication these days. Glad you’re helping out with it.

  • Let’s dive right into the deep waters: Word is starting to spread that Don has finally agreed to an offer that brings back you and…

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Apple Patent Would Allow Infrared Signals to Block iPhone Photo and Video Capture

It could also implement augmented-reality-like features

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Too bad recording is disabled, that band is really rocking out.

Recently, artists have been going to some pretty great lengths in order to cut down on the number of people taking photos and videos during concerts. Recently Apple was granted a patent for which they filed in 2011 for tech that would allow an infrared transmitter to prevent the iPhone camera from recording in certain locations.

The idea would be to restrict recording in a simpler way that doesn’t require handing out an electronic bag to each patron that will only unlock outside the venue. The user, for instance, might see a message that says “recording is currently unavailable.”

As 9to5Mac.com points out, there are also some practical applications for the technology, like using IR signals to enhance the camera and implement an augmented reality (remember when that was the craze?) system where the camera and phone screen become a heads-up display, adding information to the scene in front of you.

As always, this is a patent, so it could just stay in the realm of intellectual property forever. But, something like this could have some scary implications if it were to be used at, say, a large-scale protest or a gathering where smartphone video recordings would otherwise be very likely. On the other hand, the idea of renting a smartphone camera blocker for a wedding ceremony sounds fantastic.

http://www.popphoto.com/apple-patent-would-allow-infrared-signals-to-block-iphone-photo-and-video-capture?src=SOC&dom=fb

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